May 13, 2012

My friend Hosanna from high school is a spoken word artist and makes a living performing her art in christian churches.  I think this video is fantastic for all Christians!

Give her a listen, she is awesome!

September 18, 2011
"St. Augustine insisted that Christians avoid two opposite extremes: leaving the church because of the scandal provoked by unfaithful shepherds, on the one hand, and putting trust in good shepherds instead of Christ, on the other. He writes: “Whatever we are like, your hope must not be in us … Your hope must not be in our humanity. Whether good or bad, we are ministers. If we are good, we are faithful ministers and truly servants. Pay attention to what we administer. If we are bad, we do not cease, for that reason, to be a dispenser of the Gospel. That is why Jesus says: ‘Do and observe all things whatsoever they tell you, but do not follow their example.’ ”"

— Bishop Leonard Blair (Toledo)

(Source: catholicchronicle.org, via bishopfeed)

September 17, 2011
"I’m just wondering if we leaders in the Church are trying to attract people by making things easier. As one of my friends tells me, we’re too much into “Catholic lite.” And it’s backfiring, I’m afraid. I hear our Catholics tell me, “We don’t want Catholic lite; we want to be “lights to the world!"

— Archbishop Timothy Dolan (New York)

(Source: blog.archny.org, via bishopfeed)

March 13, 2011
Putting Jesus to the Test

Today’s gospel account of the temptations of Jesus shows how easy it is for us to be unable to find Jesus, or even lose him altogether. When we read the temptation story, it’s natural for us to identify with Jesus, because we’re all familiar with being tempted. But have we ever placed ourselves in the devil’s shoes?We should, because most of us, at one time or another, will make the same demand of Jesus that the devil did, by insisting that he prove himself.”

March 5, 2011
"I want to spread this simple and beautiful truth of the Gospel: That each of us is born from the love of God. That each of us is a child of God who belongs to the family of God, the Church. We are born to be saints - every one of us!"

— The new Archbishop of Los Angeles, Jose Gomez

December 28, 2010

Fr. Barron comments on the genealogy in the beginning of St. Matthew’s Gospel

October 27, 2010
Symbology of the Four Evangelists

If in Church you ever see a winged cow or lion and think, “What’s that all about?” Here is a short primer on the symbols and why they are used.

 

Lion: Mark starts with John the Baptist “crying out in the wilderness” the association has been made by some between that voice of John and the roar of the lion.  Also Mark is associated with the lion because the lion was rumored to sleep with one eye open, a connection with the Resurrection.  Lastly, the lion is seen as a “king of the animal kingdom”, and Christ is our king.  The lion is also courageous, and Christians will need courage to follow Christ

 

Human:  Matthew is depicted as a human because he begins his Gospel with a genealogy.  Jesus is also portrayed very humanly, he is clearly God incarnated, not just God pretending to be human.  This helps us to relate to Jesus, knowing that He was truly human just as we are human.

The Ox:  The ox is associated with the Gospel of Luke.  The ox is seen as a symbol of sacrifice, service, and strength.  We Christians should be prepared to sacrifice of ourselves for others as Christ did.

The Eagle:  The Eagle was thought to be able to stare straight into the sun.  John explains things on a “higher” level than the Synoptic Gospels.  The eagle also represents the Ascension of Jesus and His divine nature.  For Christians today, we are called to look towards eternity without flinching as we move towards our ultimate union with God.

 

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